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Video of Collooney, County Sligo, Republic of Ireland

Collooney or Coloony (Irish: Cúil Mhuine, meaning "nook of the thicket") is a town in County Sligo, Ireland.

Collooney is located just off the N4 (Dublin to Sligo) and N17 (Sligo to Galway) roads, having been bypassed twice, by the N4 in 1998, and the N17 in 1992, and is the meeting point of both roads. The town was a significant railway centre, with no less than three railway stations. In addition to the one remaining Collooney railway station, opened on 3 December 1862,[1] (on the railway from Dublin to Sligo) there was a station on the line to Claremorris (The Western Railway Corridor) and on the Sligo, Leitrim and Northern Counties Railway line to Enniskillen.

The Battle of Collooney refers to a battle which occurred on 5 September during the Irish Rebellion of 1798 when a combined force of French troops and Irish rebels defeated a force of British troops outside of Collooney near Sligo Town. It is also known as the Battle of Carricknagat.

The combined Franco-Irish forces marched north east towards Sligo on their way to Ulster and County Donegal. When they got to the village of Collooney they were confronted by a unit of English troops from the garrison in Sligo, which is approximately 5 miles to the north of Collooney. A minor battle ensued at Carricknagat, a small townland to the immediate north of Collooney, hence the alternate name for the battle: the Battle of Carricknagat.

On 5 September 1798, the Franco-Irish troops pushed east through County Sligo but were halted by a cannon which the English forces had installed above Union Rock near Collooney.

A young Irish aide to General Humbert, Lieutenant Bartholomew Teeling, distinguished himself during the encounter. Teeling cleared the way for the advancing Irish-French army by single handedly disabling an English gunnery post located high on Union Rock when he broke from the French ranks and galloped towards the gunner's position. Teeling was armed with a pistol and he shot the cannon's marksman and captured the cannon. After the loss of the cannon position the French and Irish advanced and the English retreated towards their barracks at Sligo, leaving 60 dead and 100 prisoners.

Colonel Charles Vereker, who commanded the Limerick militia in the standoff, was awarded a peerage for his role in the battle.

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